Thursday, February 6, 2014

More thrilling reading statistics

Yesterday we discussed the idea of reader statistics, a group of quantifiable annual reading measurements that one could, say, put on a baseball card, except it would be a readers card, with a picture of the person pretending to read a book on the front (instead of pretending to be at bat), and the perfectly chosen group of annual reading statistics on the back. For our first test case we looked at the statistics of an all star, possibly the library MVP reader, Marcus, the teen librarian. As promised, today we will look at my statistics.



Am I an all star, you perhaps wonder? I don't know. I am far more erratic than Marcus. And while I suspect that I could even end up leading the league in one or two categories, I will no doubt flounder horribly in others. I guess we can only compile the statistics and see. So, without further ado, here is:


The Back of My 2013 Readers Card:



1. Books Started: 2,142 (league leading)

2. Books Completed: 114 (very good)

3. Average: .053 (terrible)

4. Genres/Subgenres read from (GRF): 36 (league leading again!) (this reflects variety of reading)

5. Books of Notable Merit Completed: 4 (poor) (this reflects quality of reading)

6. Total Pages Read (TPR): 102,025 (excellent)

7. Bestsellers Completed: 2 (poor) (this reflects social zeitgeist of reading)


So what does this say about me? I am a voracious reader with a ferocious thirst for knowledge and literature, but I barely care what that knowledge or literature is, or whether anyone else thinks it's useful or interesting. While restless and not terribly focused, I read so much that I finish many books, almost by accident. 

This little list is surprisingly illuminating. You kind of have to make up the numbers though, cause you can't really know all this stuff, and you have to make up the adjectives for your totals too, but despite all that it ends up pretty accurate. What's your GRF?






1 comment:

  1. I love this idea! I'm going to pass it along to my co-workers who are involved with the summer reading programs. It might be a way to engage the teens more. Dare I say it? It might even be a great way to start an adult reading program! Hot Spit! :)

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